Broken Eggs: Where to Eat Huevos Rotos in Madrid!

Huevos rotos are a staple of the Madrid food scene—they’re that good. But not all huevos rotos are created equally! Luckily, we’ve done the taste testing for you, answering that all-important question—where to eat huevos rotos in Madrid!

Translating to “broken eggs,” this typical Spanish dish is made by frying eggs in a healthy dose of olive oil and then piling them atop a mound of fried potatoes and chunks of chorizo or slices of jamón. Huevos rotos are always served hot and quickly so that the customer can, with just the tip of their knife, break the yolk spilling the golden liquid on to the potatoes. It’s para chuparse los dedos (finger lickin’ good), as the locals would say. But where to eat huevos rotos in Madrid? That depends where you are. Here are a few of our favorites from all over the city!

Looking for where to eat huevos rotos in Madrid? We've got you covered! Here are our top picks!

Taberna Los Huevos de Lucio

Always first on any list of where to try huevos rotos in Madrid is Taberna Los Huevos de Lucio in La Latina neighborhood. This local favorite is actually run by the children of famed restaurateur Lucio Blázquez.  The original Lucio first arrived in Madrid in 1945 at the age of 12 to work at the Meson del Segoviano. Years later, the owner sold Lucio the business and in 1974 Casa Lucio opened its doors. Now, his children carry on his legacy just a few doors down at Los Huevos de Lucio. The secret to their huevos rotos? Top quality potatoes, olive oil and jamón.

Address: Calle Cava Baja, 3o

Looking for where to eat huevos rotos in Madrid? One of our favorites is Taberna Los Huevos de Lucio. Eggs, potatoes and jamón. What more could we ask for?
At Taberna Huevos de Lucio they use only the highest quality of jamón.

Taberna La Carmencita

Housed in Madrid’s second oldest tavern which dates back to 1854, La Carmencita can be found in the lively Chueca neighborhood. It’s said the writer Frederico García Lorca once lived in the apartment just above the tavern, and it’s long been known as the night-time haunt of poet Pablo Neruda, who could be found sipping vermouth at the tavern’s bar. You can try La Carmencita’s huevos rotos with either Iberian ham, chorizo or morcilla (or try all three if your arteries can handle it!)

Address: Calle Libertad, 16

La Antigua Huevería

For a different take on huevos rotos head to Malasaña’s La Antigua Huevería. They specialize in “broken eggs” with codfish and caramelized onion. Cod (bacalao) has been a Spanish tradition for centuries. Often served during lent, bacalao makes a delicious choice any day of the year, especially when accompanied by some olive oil-drenched fried eggs. If you weren’t a member of the clean plate club before, you definitely will be after eating here. Make sure to ask for bread to soak up every last morsel.

Address: Calle San Vicente Ferrer, 32

Amparito Roca

After a day of shopping in the Salamanca neighborhood, Amparito Roca has to be your next stop. A transplant from the Castilla-La Mancha region of Spain, their focus is on authentic Spanish cuisine and fresh ingredients. At Amparito Roca treat yourself to huevos rotos with jamón and peppers. This dish is sweet and mild, and cooked to perfection.

Address: Calle Juan Bravo, 12

Still hungry? If you liked our list of where to eat huevos rotos in Madrid, then come join us on our Ultimate Spanish Cuisine Tour! Learn all about Spanish cuisine while trying Madrid’s most famous dishes at 100-year-old eateries.

No matter what neighborhood you find yourself in, we’ve got you covered with our insider tips on where to eat huevos rotos in Madrid! If you’ve got any other recommendations, please comment below!

You can't come to Madrid without trying this Spanish specialty! Here's our list of where to eat huevos rotos in Madrid.
The perfect plate—fried potatoes and eggs.

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A high school foreign exchange student who just never went home—Madison continues her adventure devouring Madrid one tapa at a time. She can often be found on airplanes and/or by food. She’s a coffee addict, travel writer, language lover and especially gifted in the art of siesta.

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