Winter Warm-Ups for Foodies in Madrid

Winter in Madrid is sunny and bright but contrary to popular belief outside of Spain, it can get pretty chilly!

But we love making the most of the winter in the best way possible, so when you’re ready for something to warm you up, help is never far away! You won’t be caught out in the cold with these five winter warm-ups which are found all over the city, and happen to be delicious too.

Are you planning to visit during winter in Madrid? A café con leche will warm you right up on a winter's day, along with these other great winter warm-ups which are found all over the city, and happen to be delicious too!

1. Caldo

Caldo means broth and is an unfussy, traditional Manchego warm-up. Made with slow cooked meat, stew bones and vegetables, the ensuing broth is a magical elixir on a cold winter’s day. Caldo is served in small mugs or bowls. As you’re walking through the city, look for signs on the windows of bars or restaurants stating “Hay Caldo” (We serve Caldo).

Insider’s tip: To sample caldo in one of Madrid’s most emblematic restaurants, stop by Restaurante Llardy. Opened in 1839, this historic restaurant will warm you up and take you back in time!

Address: Carrera de San Jeronimo 8, 28014

The beautiful facade of the historic Lhardy Restaurant in central Madrid. The perfect place to warm up on a cold day during winter in Madrid!
Try a steamy bowl of caldo at this classic Madrid restaurant. Photo credit: Manuel

2. Churros and Chocolate

This indulgent combination is never far away in Madrid. Drop by any number of cafes for a thick mug of not too-sweet hot chocolate served with crunchy churros. Spaniards traditionally enjoy churros and chocolate as a breakfast treat or an afternoon snack. For a real taste of Madrid, try your hot chocolate with porras a bigger, fluffier version of the more familiar churros.

Insider’s tip: One of our favorite places for churros and chocolate is Chocolat in the Huertas Neighborhood. The owner Alfonso makes the churros and porras from scratch, frying them to order in his kitchen at the back of the café. There is even a large window onto the kitchen where you can watch Alfonso expertly make spirals of homemade churros.

Address: Calle de Santa María 30, 28014 

3. Callos a la Madrileña

For something a little heartier try Callos a la Madrileña. This tomato based, tripe stew is a Madrid classic. Reflecting on Madrid’s long-standing tradition of tail-to-snout eating, enjoying callos is like eating a page out of the city’s history. You’ll be warmed up and ready to battle the cold after sampling this special dish.

Insider’s tip: One of our favorite places for callos is Bodegas Ricla. Lovingly made by the bar owner’s mother, they are a little spicy and totally delicious!

 Address: Calle Cuchilleros 6, 28005 

Madrid's classic Callos, a hearty stew made with tomatoes, chick peas and tripe and is a great dish to warm you up on a cold day during winter in Madrid.
Warm up with a flavor-packed bowl of tripe stew.

4. Café con Leche

If you’re feeling chilly and in need of a little caffeine, take a moment for a café con leche, a shot of espresso with steamed milk. Café con leche is the favorite coffee in Madrid and should be delicious wherever you go. If you’re lucky, you’ll get a little cookie or a piece of chocolate with your coffee!

Insider’s tip: If you prefer your coffee strait up, order and an “Americano” or a “café solo, for just a shot of espresso.

5. Crema de Verduras

This popular soup is a winter favorite. Crema de verduras or pureed vegetable soup is typically made with pumpkin, zucchini, carrots or all three! A little crunchy bread and a glass of wine is all you need for winter bliss!

Insider’s tip: Look for the word casera or homemade in the description and you’ll be treated to something special.

Want a little extra help discovering the secrets of Spanish cuisine? Join us for the Ultimate Spanish Cuisine Tour and you’ll taste one of our favorite Spanish hot chocolates, sample one-of-a-kind caldo, learn all about jamón and much, much more!

As the daughter of a barbecue master and a pseudo-vegetarian, Amy’s culinary obsessions run deep. She spent time in Galicia before settling down in Madrid, where you’ll usually find her browsing the bottles of a local bodega or ogling the produce at the weekend farmer’s market.

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